Audubon Florida News

The Christmas Bird Count is Many Things to Many People

posted on January 13, 2015 in Birding,Wildlife

Georgia Shemitz captured this foggy scene on the Four Rivers Audubon Count.For many Floridians, the Audubon Christmas Bird Count (CBC) is as much a tradition over the holidays as the Christmas tree. Each Audubon chapter in Florida (44) either coordinates a count circle or has members who participate in one.  On Monday Jan. 5, the 115th 3-week CBC window closed.  Now compilers will be gathering checklists, checking on rare bird sightings and preparing to submit their data. While providing valuable data to the science community CBCs have different meaning for different individuals.

Bill Nolte of Santa Fe Audubon captured this photo of a Bald Eagle feeding on a freshly killed coyote.The average species of birds seen is well over 100 (as high as 150) with numbers of species such as Coots, Robins, Tree Swallows, gulls (at the dump) and others often in the thousands.   Some people participated in just one count while others like Alachua Audubon Society member Dottie Robbins did eight this year!

What is it that draws so many people to this annual event?

Some people use the “count” as an excuse to take a break from the rush and pressure of the holidays.  What a great way to justify spending a full day at your favorite pastime.

West Pasco Audubon counters were featured in the Tampa Tribune There is a social element in spending a whole day with a small group of people.  The “count” can result in new friendships or can give old friends a chance to catch up. Teams often bond and look forward to having an excuse to get together once a year.

For the “listers” (serious birders who love to keep lists for birds seen in lifetime, a year, a day, a county, etc.) assisting in areas other than your own can bump the numbers up quickly.   It is hard to beat local knowledge when exploring a new area with one who knows where to find the birds!

Ellen Westbrook from Florida Keys Audubon rescued this young Brown Pelican during their CBC.There is a job for everyone. Beginners will often be tasked with keeping the checklist.  This is a welcome relief to the spotters and the more experienced counters who have their hands free to focus their binoculars and scopes quickly and count as a bird or flock flies by.  Lucky for new birders the best way to learn is to get out into the field with the experts.

Whatever the reason people participate they deserve a huge thank you for making such a unique and valuable contribution to bird conservation.

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